Investing Resources

I am in no way a financial adviser (see caveat emptor here).  However, I have assembled many resources below based on the Bogleheads.org website and books (see below).

FIRST, go here to see my Retirement Investing checklist of things you need to do before you even start reading!

THEN, come back here and check out these additional resources below.

Boglehead-Recommended Websites | Boglehead-Recommended Books | Other Helpful Websites

Bogleheads-recommended Websites

A list of websites recommended by The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing by Mel Lindauer, Taylor Larimore, Mel Lindauer (In Alphabetical Order)

  1. http://www.altruistfa.com/readingroom.htm . The Reading Room of Boglehead contributor Eric Haas.  Learn much!
  2. http://crr.bc.edu . The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College – research and articles about retirement issues.
  3. http://www.bloomberg.com. Financial news and information
  4. http://www.bogleheads.org. The home of “Bogleheads” – most useful and most visited financial forum in the world
  5. http://www.bylo.org.  Canadian website – mutual fund information.
  6. http://www.choosetosave.org. Financial calculators and ways to save.
  7. http://www.coffeehouseinvestor.com. Author Bill Schultheis website.
  8. http://www.efficientfrontier.com. Author Bill Bernstein’s website.
  9. http://www.thefinanceprofessor.com. Jim Mahaer’s website – professor of finance at St. Bonaventure University
  10. http://www.financialpage.blogspot.com. Current research articles useful to Boglehead investors. Extensive archive.
  11. http://www.firecalc.com. A detailed online calculator for determining satisfactory portfolio withdrawal rates in retirement.
  12. http://www.investorsolutions.com/?submit=Go&s=Books. Excellent online book list with Investment Strategies for the 21st Century.
  13. http://www.jasonzweig.com. WSJ.com writer Jason Zweig’s website.  One of the best financial columnists – “for investors who want to learn to think for themselves.”
  14. http://www.jonathanclements.com. Author Jonathan Clements website with easy-to-understand articles.
  15. http://www.moneychimp.com. Everything about money; articles, calculators, and much more.
  16. http://www.morningstar.com. Best source of information about mutual funds and tons of investment information
  17. http://www.norstad.org/finance. Author John Norstad’s articles.
  18. http://www.research-finance.com. John P. Scordo’s collection of the best academic and financial articles.
  19. http://www.retireearlyhomepage.com. John P. Greaney’s website.  He retired at age 38 (!).
  20. http://www.rickferri.com. Author and Boglehead Podcast contributor, Richard Ferri’s website.
  21. http://www.vanguard.com/bogle_site/bogle_home.html. For a great learning experience, browse the archives, where you’ll find Mr. Bogle’s many speeches.

BOOKS

A list of books for more insight:

BOOKS FOR NOVICE INVESTORS

  1. The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing (by Mel Lindauer, Taylor Larimore, Mel Lindauer)
  2. The Bogleheads’ Guide to the Three-Fund Portfolio (by Taylor Larimore)
  3. The Coffeehouse Investor by Bill Shultheis (Kirkland, WA: Palouse Press, 2005).
  4. The Informed Investor by Frank Armstrong III (New York: American Management Association, 2003). An easy-to-understand explanation of how the market works.
  5. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John C. Bogle (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2007).
  6. The Millionaire in You by Michael LeBoeuf (New York: Crown Business, 2002).
  7. Protecting Your Wealth in Good Times and Bad by Richard A. Ferri, CFA (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003).
  8. Straight Talk on Investing by Jack Brennan, Vanguard’s former CEO (New York: Wiley, 2004).
  9. You’ve Lost It, Now What? by Jonathan Clements (New York: Portfolio, 2003).

BOOKS FOR INTERMEDIATE INVESTORS

  1. Bogle on Mutual Funds: New Perspectives for the Intelligent Investor by Vanguard founder John Bogle (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993).
  2. Common Sense on Mutual Funds by  John Bogle (New York: Wiley, 1999;2009).
  3. The Four Pillars of Investing by Bill Bernstein (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002).
  4. The Only Guide to a Winning Investment Strategy You’ll Ever Need by Larry Swedroe (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2005).
  5. A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton G. Malkiel (New York: Norton, 2003;2016).

BOOKS FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO LEARN MORE

  1. All About Asset Allocation, Second Edition by Roger C. Gibson (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2000).
  2. Capital Ideas by Peter L. Bernstein (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2005).
  3. The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham, with Jason Zweig commentary (Revised.  New York: HarperCollins, 2006).
  4. The Only Guide to a Winning Bond Strategy by Larry Swedroe.
  5. The White Coat Investor (by James Dahle) *particularly for Doctors, Lawyers, and other high-earners
  6. The White Coat Investor’s Financial Boot Camp (by James Dahle) *particularly for Doctors, Lawyers, and other high-earners
  7. Bogleheads.org recommended reading list
  8. List of more Boglehead-recommended books (Updated periodically): https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Books:_recommendations_and_reviews

Other Finance-related Websites

These are not necessarily recommended by Bogleheads but may provide some usefulness in financial planning:

  1. Center for Retirement Research – at Boston College
  2. IRAhelp.com – by Ed Slott, named “The Best” source for IRA advice by the Wall Street Journal.
  3. AnnualCreditReport.com – obtain one free credit report per year from each of the three credit bureaus.
  4. Clark.com – Clark Howard’s site
  5. Vanguard.com – Vanguard investor homepage
  6. CreditKarma.com – Monitor your credit score for free
  7. PersonalCapital.com –  aggregates all your financial accounts to give you a daily update and asset allocation
  8. www.PortfolioVisualizer.com – evaluate different allocations and expected returns over the long term.  Uses Monte Carlo simulations.
  9. Morningstar.com (many times this is free through your library) – See all the details on each fund, expense ratios, index benchmarks, returns, stability, etc).  Also can look at the Morningstar 9-box which shows how each fund (or your entire portfolio) is positioned.