2021 Previews: SEC East

 

1. Georgia Bulldogs (11-1, 8-0)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Vg
Running Backs: Ex
Wide Receivers: Av
Offensive Line: Vg

Defensive Line: Vg
Linebackers: Vg
Defensive Backs: Vg
Special Teams: Ex

The think its their year for a title, and they may be right. Aside from the wide receiver position – which yet has the potential to develop into a team strength – the Bulldogs have exceptional balance on both offense and defense. The only question, team-wide, is that of experienced depth, as a lot of the expected second-teamers will be relative newbies. A relatively easy schedule only helps things.

Offense: What could go right
J.T. Daniels took the quarterback position from Stetson Bennett at midseason and Georgia’s offense immediately got more dangerous. But Daniels didn’t exactly play against a murderers’ row of opponents; the best team he played as a starter was Cincinnati, and Georgia’s overall output was only impressive in one of his starts (Missouri). Still, he’s a serious upgrade over Bennett thanks to his better physical skills and ability to identify secondary receivers more quickly. The running back group could be the best in the SEC. The offensive line has a lot of talent, but two starters must be replaced and the other positions are being shuffled around a bit.

Offense: What could go wrong
Injuries. Georgia basically doesn’t have a tight end right now. Darnell Washington will probably miss at least the first couple of games of the season following foot surgery; unfortunately, Georgia’s toughest game is its first one, against Clemson. Backup John FitzPatrick is also banged up, and LSU transfer Arik Gilbert is currently not with the team. Wide receiver is in a similar rough spot, as George Pickens is trying to come back from ACL surgery, Jermaine Burton is also hobbled at the moment, and Demetris Robertson transferred to Auburn. All four starting positions could be handled by freshmen in the opener.

Defense: What could go right
Georgia’s linebacker group has the potential to be truly special, even though just one starter returns from the 2020 unit. The defensive line also has the potential to be dominant. What both groups lacked at times in 2020 was consistency, but that might actually improve in 2021 with the change in personnel. The special teams are elite.

Defense: What could go wrong
The defensive backfield seemingly lost a dozen people in the NFL this spring, but still returns at least two guys – S Lewis Cine, CB Ameer Speed – who will go highly in next spring’s draft. The question here is mostly that of fit, learning to play together, and especially depth. Depth, in fact, is the preeminent concern across the defense. Georgia was able to rotate a lot of players last year that were of equal ability and experience, but that won’t be the case in 2021, at least not in regards to the latter and perhaps not the former, either. The injury bug has also done a number on the expected starters in the kick-return game, so the might need to find temporary replacements there.

One-sentence summary: A potentially elite team that needs the breaks to finally go its way.
This includes managing injuries, as well as convincing the head coach not to call untimely fake punts at strange times in conference championship games. Florida is coming back to the field a bit in 2021, so it’s hard to imagine any team other than Georgia representing the SEC East in Atlanta. But Georgia has to capitalize on its opportunities.

2. Kentucky Wildcats (10-2, 6-2)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Fr
Running Backs: Vg
Wide Receivers: Av
Offensive Line: Vg

Defensive Line: Av
Linebackers: Av
Defensive Backs: Vg
Special Teams: Vg

If you’re shocked to see Kentucky sitting a predicted second place in the SEC East, you’re not alone. Basically, whether Kentucky or Florida finishes second will probably come down to their game on Oct. 2. The Wildcats have slowly built a respectable program under Mark Stoops, and a combination of better-than-historical development of the big men on both sides of the ball and a renewed focus on offensive explosiveness may finally help the Wildcats achieve more than just respectable results.

Offense: What could go right
Quietly, Kentucky has developed top-shelf running back talent year in and year out under Stoops, and this year won’t be any different. Chris Rodriguez is underrated because he plays for Kentucky; his stats stand up to any other top-tier SEC starter. Scatback JuTahn McClain is pushing Rodriguez enough that the Wildcats won’t be able to keep McClain off the field. Kevosiey Smoke has looked good in the past but has been injured several times; his re-emergence has been one of the drivers behind Kentucky experimenting with 2-RB sets as its base. Receiver is deep, with steady Josh Ali and Nebraska transfer Wan’Dale Robinson the likely starters. The offensive line was already good in the spring – and then added LSU transfer Dare Rosenthal, an elite talent, as a transfer.

Offense: What could go wrong
Kentucky has already lost TE Keaton Upshaw, a budding star, to a knee injury. His loss was significant enough that Kentucky’s intentions on running Ace as its base formation may have to change. Justin Rigg, Upshaw’s replacement, isn’t the athlete Upshaw was, and the Wildcats recently had to move WR Izayah Cummings to the position just to have enough bodies. But the big focus is on the quarterback position. Former transfer Joey Gatewood left the Wildcats for mid-camp, leaving holdover Beau Allen and Penn State transfer Will Levis to fight for the job. Levis hasn’t shown to be a great thrower when the defense is able to bring pressure, which makes the offensive line’s success even that more important.

Defense: What could go right
The secondary is again the highlight position group for Kentucky, led by a pair of solid safeties, Yusuf Corker and Tyrell Ajian. Vito Tisdale will play about five different positions for the Wildcats, including outside linebacker as the Wildcats experiment with non-traditional personnel groupings. The other name to watch here is CB Cedrick Dort, who practice observers really like. The star up front is DE Josh Paschal, who landed on the preseason all-SEC list. Kentucky should be fairly solid on the edges, both at DL and LB.

Defense: What could go wrong
Injuries cost Kentucky two potential starters, the tight end Upshaw and MLB D’Eryk Jackson. As a result, Ole Miss transfer Jacquez Jones now likely ascends to the position, but he was often part of the problem with Ole Miss’ defense when he was there. We’ll see what a difference the change of scenery (and coaching) makes. New nosetackle Marquan McCall gets the done, but hasn’t shown himself to be dynamic. When Kentucky goes to nickel personnel with a four-man front, it will also put OLB/DE Jordan Wright in the spotlight, and he needs to be more consistent. As for special teams, this is likely to either boom or bust depending on how walk-on PK Matt Ruffolo backs up his 2020 season, and how Australian P Wilson Berry acclimates to the college game.

One-sentence summary: The pieces are there, but we’ve heard this song before.
At some point, Kentucky has to cash in. Stoops has felt this, which is why he fired his good friend Eddie Gran as offensive coordinator. But that decision could have negative consequences, as Gran, while not highly thought of as an offensive coordinator, was a fantastic running backs coach. At some point, Stoops is going to have to show he can take the next step forward, even at a mid-tier in the cutthroat SEC.

3. Florida Gators (9-3, 5-3)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Av
Running Backs: Vg
Wide Receivers: Av
Offensive Line: Av

Defensive Line: Av
Linebackers: Vg
Defensive Backs: Av
Special Teams: Fr

This is a rebuilding year for Florida, as the offense lost virtually all of its playmakers, and the defensive front and secondary were both gutted by graduation and the NFL Draft. The Gators still have enough raw talent coming up to be competitive, but they’ll be vulnerable early, especially in regards to offensive flow. The Gators’ game against Kentucky will likely decide the runner-up spot in the SEC East.

Offense: What could go right
It all depends on QB Emory Jones; if he is as good as advertised, Florida will revert back to Dan Mullen’s Mississippi State days as an offense and run the spread-option until are sick of it. Jones’ weakness is his midrange accuracy, and if that continues, the offense cannot be what it was under Kyle Trask. Jones is listed at 6’2”, 210 but doesn’t look that big. If he struggles, or takes too much punishment, freshman Anthony Richardson, a bigger body, will be brought in. The running back group is by far the strength of the offense on paper, with Dameon Pierce, Malik Davis, Nay’Quan Wright and Clemson transfer Demarkcus Bowman all set to get significant carries. And while Kyle Pitts’ days are over at tight end, freshman Nick Elksnis has been a fall camp standout.

Offense: What could go wrong
Florida has a lot of offensive line depth, but there are no superstars. The closest thing might be Texas transfer Jean Delance, who’ll start at right tackle. Elsewhere, although the running back room is as full as a tick, it hasn’t always translated into dominating performances. The wide receiver group is virtually all new, and this year’s bunch are more the “typical” wideout than was the departed Kadarius Toney. That’s fine for most teams, but Mullen’s offense functions at its best when he has versatile playmakers who can go off-script.

Defense: What could go right
Florida brought in Penn State transfer Antonio Shelton and transfer Daquan Newkirk to shore up the interior of the line. Together with elite DE Zachary Carter, Florida should be able to improve up front. The linebacker group has a chance to be excellent – but also could be just so-so. Brenton Cox will play a lot more with his hand down this year, while Mohamoud Diabate transitions from stand-up end to a more traditional inside player. Presuming those edits work out, Florida’s front seven, which at times last year looked like it couldn’t stop anyone, could become the strength of the team.

Defense: What could go wrong
Florida ranked 100th in pass defense, 71st in rush defense and 74th in scoring defense in 2020 and couldn’t hang its hat on anything. That may not change much in 2021. Kaiir Elam is a fantastic cornerback and potential high pick in the NFL Draft, and safety Trey Dean is being pegged for a breakout season. But the rest of the backfield is a bit of a mess, and that was before CB Jaydon Hill was lost for the year with a knee injury. The moves being made in front of the secondary might help things out, or could be a lot of sound and fury and nothing else. Florida’s defensive coaching staff came under pretty intense scrutiny, scheme-wise, in 2020, and that won’t let up until the Gators prove themselves. The biggest issue, though, may be the kicking game, where the Gators took Mississippi State transfer Jace Christmann at kicker, only to watch him perhaps kick his way out of the in fall camp. Freshman Australian punter Jeremy Crawshaw has not been impressive, either.

One-sentence summary: Gators won’t catch anyone by surprise in 2021.
The talent just isn’t there in enough places to make Florida a title contender again. But that’s not to say the Gators can’t put up another 10-win season and maybe play spoiler to a better team. Until the offense settles in, though, it can’t happen, because Florida just isn’t good enough on defense to bail out the offense in the event it struggles.

4. Tigers (7-5, 3-5)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Vg
Running Backs: Fr
Wide Receivers: Av
Offensive Line: Av

Defensive Line: Vg
Linebackers: Fr
Defensive Backs: Av
Special Teams: Vg

At times in 2020, looked like a team on the verge of making a move. The Tigers ended up being Alabama’s second-toughest out of the season, behind only Florida in the SEC Championship Game, but in other games, the Tigers looked a mile away from where they want to be (see: Tennessee 35, Tigers 12). The offense is rebuilding a bit, but the defense and special teams are sound.

Offense: What could go right
The Tigers are going to go as far – and only as far – as QB Connor Bazelak will take them. Bazelak won co-SEC Freshman of the Year honors after taking the reins of the quarterback position at midseason and throwing for a ton of yards, but he also threw only 7 touchdowns against 6 interceptions. He throws a nice deep ball and sees the field uncommonly well, but he needs to continue to improve. The offensive line is a veteran unit, returning four starters from a year ago, but the Tigers didn’t convert enough drives into points. If Bazelak and the OL can improve their ability to follow through at the end of drives, the Tigers could challenge for third in the division, maybe even second.

Offense: What could go wrong
If the skill positions don’t come around, this could be a long year. Tyler Badie was expected to take over at running back but he’s been hurt. Badie’s slight size was already a strike against him; if he can’t go, the even smaller Elijah Young will have to do the job. Running back depth in general isn’t very good. Depth isn’t an issue at receiver, but production is. Keke Chism and Tauskie Dove have been around seemingly forever, as has Barrett Bannister, but they don’t scare anyone. The guy who might do that is Ohio State transfer Mookie Cooper, who is tiny but has blistering speed. Tight end Daniel Parker Jr. is an asset in the running game but isn’t much of a receiver. Bazelak needs weapons, and has precious few of them to give.

Defense: What could go right
The defensive coaching staff was upgraded across the board, and they’ll have plenty to work with in a re-imagined front seven. DE Trajan Jeffcoat is the stud of the group, and probably the next high pick from the DL. There will be a lot of new faces at linebacker but Missouri likes what it has, and it’s a program hallmark for this unit to play bigger than it really is. The kickers are some of the best in the conference – PK Harrison Mevis especially thrives under pressure situations – and this unit might be tops in the conference if the return game was better than it was. If Missouri can upgrade its return units, look out.

Defense: What could go wrong
must get better production out of the interior tackles, especially Kobie Whiteside, whose production fell off steeply in 2020 due to injuries. Akial Byers needs to up his game as well. The bigger problem is the secondary, which ranked 84th in the nation last year and was probably worse than the numbers actually showed. couldn’t create turnovers, and only CB Ennis Rakestraw Jr. – who Missouri plucked away from Alabama when the Crimson Tide ran out of scholarships to give – looked capable of sizing up top SEC receivers. Even though he has just one year under his belt, he’s an elder statesman among a group of players who were mostly playing ball a year ago. Safety Martez Manuel put together a solid year, but he needs help. He may get it from last year’s original starting quarterback, Shawn Robinson, who changed positions.

One-sentence summary: Few teams get more out of their ability than Missouri.
Never an easy out, the Tigers put up solid results after an offseason coaching change in 2020 and seem to be on the right track, but unless Eliah Drinkwitz figures out a way to win more on Signing Day, he’s not going to win much more often on gameday. If Bazelak breaks out, eight or nine wins are possible, but the supporting cast has to have a banner year.

5. Tennessee Volunteers (5-7, 2-6)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Vg
Running Backs: Fr
Wide Receivers: Av
Offensive Line: Fr

Defensive Line: Av
Linebackers: Fr
Defensive Backs: Vg
Special Teams: Vg

Tennessee is desperate to climb back to respectability and hired Josh Heupel away from to try to make it happen. But many of the same problems that have plagued recent Tennessee teams are still present in this version. The Vols made good use of the transfer portal over the offseason, particularly under center, but there isn’t enough quality in the middle of the roster to allow Tennessee to make a huge leap in 2021.

Offense: What could go right
Heupel correctly surmised his offense didn’t have enough talent at the quarterback position and brought in two transfers, Hendon Hooker from Virginia Tech and Joe Milton from Michigan. Hooker is a runner first and has superior career stats to Milton, but Milton will apparently win the job. He’s a big-bodied quarterback who can move, and his arm strength is good. Behind these two are holdovers Harrison Bailey – who put up good numbers off the bench last year, but never could seem to get a feel for leading the team – and Brian Maurer, who is testing out the transfer portal. Honestly, the best thing for all parties is that Jarrett Guarantano’s eligibility ran out. If Milton or Hooker prove to be what Heupel thinks they are, Tennessee will be more dynamic in the passing game. There will be three starting receivers, led by Velus Jones Jr. and Mississippi State transfer JaVonta Payton, and Tennessee likes the mix of talent and measurables it has there.

Offense: What could go wrong
The offensive line is thin – Tennessee may play only six or seven players, tops, this year – and both tackles are a big question mark. Darnell Wright and Cade Mays are both out of position; Wright is a right tackle that will be shifted to the left side, and Mays is a guard. A walk-on, Dayne Davis, is the top reserve at guard and tackle. The one guy who could surprise is Javontez Spraggins, thanks to a lot of work he put into conditioning over the offseason. The running back group is largely untested, although Jabari Small has some ability. The tight end position is in a mad scramble after Austin Pope was forced to give up football. A former tailback, Preston Fant, appears likely to win the job, with a true freshman, Miles Campbell, backing him up. Both guys are under 6’2”.

Defense: What could go right
The defensive backfield could be a strength if, and only if, the new coaching staff can make the most of the most veteran unit on the entire team. Tennessee ranked 106th in pass defense last year, but the parts are there to effect a better scenario in 2021. Alontae Taylor is the leader of this unit and will be the primary corner. While the off-corner position is open, Alabama fans will recognize one of the names fighting for the job: Brandon Turnage. Turnage often showed out in scrimmages in Tuscaloosa, and he’s competing with Kenneth George and Warren Burrell for the job. A pair of veteran safeties round out the group. Tennessee also hit the transfer portal up front and got MLB Juwan Mitchell from Texas, DT Caleb Tremblay from Southern Cal and NT Da’Jon Terry from Kansas. All have a shot to start, and Mitchell is virtually guaranteed of it.

Defense: What could go wrong
Tennessee has had issues getting its defensive ends involved in the pass-rush game, and that has to change. Tennessee’s ends combined for just 3 sacks in 2020. Matthew Butler, LaTrell Bumphus and Tyler Baron all have the physique and the measurables, but haven’t been able to produce. Starting NT Aubrey Solomon has been very average in his career despite his recruiting pedigree. The linebacker group as a whole is a collection of unknowns, transfers and guys who haven’t flashed yet. was probably the most intriguing coming out of spring camp.

One-sentence summary: A collection of hired guns, led by a head coach who hasn’t proven himself yet.
One of the “could go wrong” scenarios involves Heupel himself. Tennessee seemed to have to settle for him after firing Jeremy Pruitt, as Heupel’s program at was starting to unravel a bit. Tennessee football, for most of the past 20 years, has been champagne expectations with cheap beer results. The Vols are in serious danger of being locked into the SEC’s middle tier (if it hasn’t already happened), especially once Texas and Oklahoma come onboard. In order to avoid that scenario, the Vols must win again, and win big. But this won’t be the year that it happens.

6. Commodores (4-8, 1-7)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Fr
Running Backs: Fr
Wide Receivers: Av
Offensive Line: Fr

Defensive Line: Fr
Linebackers: Pr
Defensive Backs: Av
Special Teams: Av

It may be back to business as usual for in 2021 – and that means sinking to the bottom of the SEC East’s shipyard, with no way to get off the bottom. A more appropriate-for-the-talent defensive scheme, decent special teams and some potential at quarterback and wide receiver could make things better than expected, but four wins is about all the Commodores can hope for.

Offense: What could go right
It basically comes down to Temple transfer RB Re’Mahn Davis and what he’s able to accomplish. He rushed for more than 1,000 yards as a freshman and then showed more skill in an abbreviated 2020 season. Now he’s the guy in Nashville. Davis has decent size and good speed to go with that size, and he can plan on 30 carries a game with the Commodores. He’ll need some help, and if sophomore QB Ken Seals continues to develop, he may get it. Vanderbilt also returns a veteran receiving corps with four guys (Chris Johnson, Amir Abdur-Rahman, Chris Pierce Jr. and Will Sheppard) plus TE Ben Bresnahan, and all have good basic skills. With new head coach Clark Lea wanting more balance in the offense and a little more dynamic mix of plays, it could play to these units’ strengths.

Offense: What could go wrong
There is no depth – none – at running back. If something happens to Re’Mahn Davis, the effect would be catastrophic. The best way to protect Davis is for the offensive line to improve, but there isn’t much there outside of Cole Clemens and Tyler Steen. They’ll start at left guard and left tackle, respectively, after experimenting with flipping those two slots in the spring. Things got even more dire when Drew Birchmeier, who was projected to start at right guard, gave up football over the summer. The depth situation is a problem at quarterback, too, where Mike Wright was disappointing in his 2020 auditions.

Defense: What could go right
This is one of the most veteran secondaries in the SEC, with all eight players in the two-deep being upperclassmen. Problem is, Vanderbilt ranked 119th in pass defense last year. Free safety Dashaun Jerkins could probably play for any team in the league, and his partner at strong safety, Maxwell Worship, was a difference-maker after joining the starting lineup at midseason. Cornerback play has to get better, but Vanderbilt at least has some options there. DE Elijah McAllister will likely find himself drafted next spring, and he’s hands-down the leader of the defensive line. But he needs help.

Defense: What could go wrong
So many possibilities, so little time to discuss them all. MLB Anfernee Orji is way too small for the position and is there basically out of necessity. But he’s eons better than anyone else Vanderbilt has, at any of the three spots in its 4-3 base. The defensive tackles were a big disappointment in 2020. There are just no playmakers here, nor possibilities to develop any. Florida transfer Malik Langham has some ability at DT, but it wasn’t enough to unseat Daevion Davis or Raashaan Wilkins Jr. during camp. In the kicking game, Harrison Smith is a decent punter; at kicker, Vandy will go with Alabama transfer Joseph Bulovas. Leg strength on both players is an issue.

One-sentence summary: Lea is unlikely to turn this ship around.
Vanderbilt played hard for and on a couple of occasions, it appeared the Commodores were on the verge of doing bigger things. But there’s just not enough size or speed throughout the roster to get the done. Vanderbilt doesn’t prioritize football the way the other SEC schools do, and it shows, clearly, year after year. Nothing is going to change until the administration stops being content with cashing big SEC checks and starts investing in the program, as well as not hamstringing it with higher admission requirements. That’s just all there is to it.

7. South Carolina Gamecocks (3-9, 0-8)

Rankings (Ex, Vg, Av, Fr, Pr)
Quarterbacks: Pr
Running Backs: Vg
Wide Receivers: Fr
Offensive Line: Fr

Defensive Line: Vg
Linebackers: Fr
Defensive Backs: Fr
Special Teams: Vg

On paper, the Gamecocks are better than Vanderbilt, and the matchup between the two will likely decide the basement of the SEC East just like Kentucky-Florida could decide the runner-up spot. Shane Beamer is taking over after Will Muschamp flamed out, and for all practical purposes, Beamer will have to rebuild from nothing, especially on offense. The Gamecocks have one top-level player on offense, the league’s worst quarterback situation, and a defense gutted by graduation.

Offense: What could go right
You would be excused if you thought Alabama’s Najee Harris was the SEC’s leading rusher a year ago, but it was actually another Harris – South Carolina’s Kevin Harris. Kevin Harris put up 1,138 yards on the ground and was also the team’s third-leading receiver. He looked set to lead this team into the Beamer era until suffering a back injury in fall camp. Now his season might be abbreviated. If he can’t go, freshman Marshawn Lloyd will be the man – and South Carolina needs Harris to be a “go.” Aside from Harris, there’s not a lot here. The Gamecocks appear set to use a two-tight end Ace set as their base formation, with 6’7”, 250-pound E.J. Jenkins, who also has the speed to play wide receiver, starting at one of those spots. He’s the only thing about the passing game that excites anyone. The offensive line needs massive improvement over last year and the left side will be new, but the new coaching staff likes what they’re seeing so far.

Offense: What could go wrong
Part of what could go wrong, already has. Between Harris’ injury as well as the injury to projected starting QB Luke Doty, the Gamecocks begin the year scrambling. With Doty out for awhile with a foot injury, one of two transfers from lower-division St. Francis – Jason Brown – will start under center. The other St. Francis transfer, incidentally, is the aforementioned TE E.J. Jenkins. How Beamer knew to raid the Red Flash for its quarterback and tight end, we’ll never know. Meanwhile, South Carolina still hasn’t gotten the plan down for the rest of the receiver corps. Nick Muse will start opposite Jenkins in the Ace, but the wideouts need to prove themselves.

Defense: What could go right
The defensive line and special teams, basically. If DE Kingsley Enagbare and DTs Zacch Pickens and Jabari Ellis finally play up to their combined potential – and especially if either Jordan Burch or Aaron Sterling emerge at the other end spot – the Gamecock DL could wind up being one of the best units in the conference. Enagbare lit up spring ball as a pass rusher, and if Burch can put everything together, they’ll bring a rare mix of speed and size to the outside. As for the special teams, PK Parker White enters his fifth year as a starter, and punter Kai Kroeger improved steadily as 2020 went along and ended up as one of the best in the league.

Defense: What could go wrong
It’s going to be ugly behind the defensive line. The linebacker group last year underperformed, and is still not settled. Georgia State transfer Jordan Strachan – a former walk-on at safety before he blew up into a LB/DE – will probably start along with holdovers Damani Staley and Sherrod Greene. Greene’s 2020 season was wiped out by a broken hip, and there may have been a degree of permanent damage done to his game. The Gamecocks like Mohamed Kaba, but he couldn’t unseat Staley or Greene in camp despite a lot of chances. The secondary is in even worse shape. R.J. Roderick is the only returning starter, but the best player is probably FS Jaylin Dickerson if he can stay out of the medical tent. Cam Smith is average as a cornerback, but he’s the best available. The defensive line wore itself out last year trying to cover up weaknesses elsewhere, and that might be happening again in 2021.

One-sentence summary: A depleted roster and a neophyte coaching staff mean trouble in the elite SEC.
Hiring Shane Beamer didn’t exactly set the football world on fire. This will be his first head coaching job, and if his father wasn’t Frank Beamer, he likely would never have gotten this opportunity – at least not this soon in his career. How much patience will South Carolina have with him? It’s hard to say – and he’ll need a lot. South Carolina’s recruiting was horrific over the offseason when judged by SEC contender standards. And when the Gamecocks did take transfers from other teams, those teams were mostly also-rans and lower-division programs. This could be a train wreck getting ready to happen.

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